Barn Burning Essay | Student Essay

This student essay consists of approximately 4 pages of analysis of Sarty's Conflict in William Faulkner's "Barn Burning".
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Sarty's Conflict in William Faulkner's "Barn Burning"

Summary: In "Barn Burning" by William Faulkner, the protagonist Sarty exemplifies how conflicting loyalties can affect decisions. On one hand, Sarty has the morals that society has instilled in him in spite of his barn-burning father. One the other hand, Sarty remains loyal to his father, who raised and provided for him. While Sarty eventually chooses society over his father, through betraying his father to Major de Spain, he immediately regrets his decision.
Sarty's Conflict

William Faulkner's "Barn Burning" provides an excellent example of how conflicting loyalties can affect decisions. In Faulkner's story, the main character, Sarty, faces such a dilemma. On one hand, Sarty has the morals that society has instilled in him in spite of his father. One the other hand, Sarty has the loyalty to his father because of the blood ties shared between them and the fact that his father raised and provided for him. Ultimately, it is these conflicting ideas that will lead to Sarty's final decision.

Sarty definitely feels a large obligation to be loyal to his father because of blood ties. Faulkner makes this quite clear in the text several times. Even in the first paragraph Sarty looks at the prosecutor and thinks, "our enemy" (Faulkner76) and also "mine and his both! He's my father!" (Faulkner 74). Faulkner...

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This section contains 993 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Student Essay on Sarty's Conflict in William Faulkner's "Barn Burning"
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