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Essay | The Crucible - Morality vs. Law

This student essay consists of approximately 2 pages of analysis of The Crucible.
This section contains 460 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Student Essay on The Crucible - Morality  vs. Law

The Crucible - Morality vs. Law

Summary: In Arthur Miller's "The Crucible," the question of what reputation means to a person is brought out during the Salen Witch Trials. John Proctor is encouraged to sign the confession of witchcraft in order to avoid execution. However, he refuses to sign, believing that living with his good name permanently damaged was a worse fate than keeping his good name and being hanged for it.
Arthur Miller's, "The Crucible", is set during the Salem witch trials in 1692.

"The Crucible", is considered to be a great American classic brutal portrayal of the witch trials. The play is drenched with symbolism and ponders the question of, "Would you die to protect your name"" This very question is brought up in Act IV when John Proctor is ask sign his confession and he refuses for he wants to keep his earthly reputation.

John Proctor refuses to sign the form because he obviously knows that he is not a witch and the whole situation is preposterous, and argues that God has heard him confess, what more does Danforth want? If John were to sign he would be a free man but would have to live the rest of his life with his good name soiled with witchcraft on top of the already present...

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This section contains 460 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Student Essay on The Crucible - Morality  vs. Law
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