Candide Essay | Student Essay

This student essay consists of approximately 6 pages of analysis of Freud's Id, Ego, and Superego Analysis of Voltaire's Candide.
This section contains 1,721 words
(approx. 6 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Student Essay on Freud's Id, Ego, and Superego Analysis of Voltaire's Candide

Freud's Id, Ego, and Superego Analysis of Voltaire's Candide

Summary: The two extremes of human action are Id and Superego. Actions based on Id are basic human instinct: Instincts of sexuality, aggression, and instant gratification. Freud believed actions solely based upon Id were immature and saw this immaturity practiced by children. Voltaire satirically portrays this immaturity through each of the basic human instincts.
During a time of revolution, Voltaire wrote Candide in desperation to bring true insight on mankind's ignorance. Kicked out of his castle, Candide adventures throughout Europe encountering violent acts, and then retribution for those acts. Consistent violence throughout the novel and its motives invoke thought on a main theme of justice, Voltaire either coincidentally or intently portrayed. Justice was often carried out irrationally and usually with little to no justification, and Freud's Id, Ego, and Superego theory on mankind's action clearly gives justification to mankind's acts seeming like no justification exists. Sigmund Freud's theory divided the state of conscience action into three parts, Id, Ego, and Superego, and each category was able to cause direct action: Id causes action based on basic instinct regarding aggression, sexual desire, and gratifying release; Superego causes action based on societal morality; Ego causes action based...

(read more)

This section contains 1,721 words
(approx. 6 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Student Essay on Freud's Id, Ego, and Superego Analysis of Voltaire's Candide
Copyrights
BookRags
Freud's Id, Ego, and Superego Analysis of Voltaire's Candide from BookRags. (c)2014 BookRags, Inc. All rights reserved.