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Essay | Claudio's Impulsiveness

This student essay consists of approximately 4 pages of analysis of Claudio's Impulsiveness.
This section contains 908 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Student Essay on Claudio's Impulsiveness

Claudio's Impulsiveness

Summary: Shakespeare's comedies possess happy endings, with characters ultimately getting what they deserve. Claudio and Hero's marriage is celebrated, and the wounds that are formed during the extent of the play finally begin to close up. Don John is captured after his attempt to escape Messina, and the shame on Hero is lifted as her innocence is restored. However, in Much Ado About Nothing, a large portion of the trouble that occurs can be attributed to Claudio's impulsiveness.
Shakespeare's comedic play, Much Ado About Nothing, begins with the return of Prince Don Pedro of Aragon to the city of Messina after his triumphant battle against his bastard brother, Don John. Under his command is a particular soldier by the name of Claudio of Florence, who proved to be a valuable asset in the war. Leonato, the governor of Messina, welcomes back Don Pedro and his company into the Italian city. Claudio is immediately love-struck by Leonato's only child and daughter, Hero, and the eventual communal love between Claudio and Hero is what supplies the plot for Shakespeare's play. However, Claudio is revealed early on in the story as an impulsive character that acts spontaneously and irresponsibly. His reckless nature is exposed through his misplacement of trust, his tendency to jump to conclusions, and his eagerness to carry out actions.

Claudio's rash behavior is shown through his...

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This section contains 908 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Student Essay on Claudio's Impulsiveness
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