A Midsummer Night's Dream Essay | A Character Analysis of Theseus in Shakespeare's A Midsummer Nights Dream

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A Character Analysis of Theseus in Shakespeare's A Midsummer Nights Dream

Summary: In William Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream, the character Theseus appears prominently only in the first act and near the end of the play. Theseus appears to be a stern, heartless, and cruel character in the early part of the story; he gives Hermia the choice of either marrying Demetrius or death, and thus contributes greatly to the dilemma of who loves whom. However, near the end of the play he comes to terms of Hermia's true feelings and allows her and her lover Lysander to follow their hearts.

Character Analysis

Character Analysis of "Theseus"

Throughout the story Theseus was laid back waiting upon the arrival of his marriage. "now fair Hippolyta our nuptial hour draws apace. Four happy days bring in another moon." (Shakespeare 7). After the first act of the book Theseus becomes an obsolete character. When we first met him it seemed as though he would be loud, energetic, and play a large role is the plot. But as it turns out he just got the lovers revelations started. After which we never hear from him until the end when the lovers are set straight.

When the play began it seemed as though Theseus was going to be a very heartless and cruel character throughout the book. "For you, fair Hermia, look you arm yourself to fit your fathers will, or else the law of Athens...

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This section contains 869 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Student Essay on A Character Analysis of Theseus in Shakespeare's A Midsummer Nights Dream
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