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Essay | How Does Tale of Two Cities Romanticise the French Revolution?

This student essay consists of approximately 5 pages of analysis of How Does Tale of Two Cities Romanticise the French Revolution?.
This section contains 1,247 words
(approx. 5 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Student Essay on How Does Tale of Two Cities Romanticise the French Revolution?

How Does Tale of Two Cities Romanticise the French Revolution?

Summary: In a Tale of Two Cities, Charles Dickens makes it seem like the only people that are scared are the nobles or former nobles and that the common people are not afraid of anything. This book wasn't the Tale of Two cities at all, it was a love story made to portray one person as a hero and only was the background for the story brought up when it needed to be in order to romanticize the novel further.
Charles Dickens romanticises the French Revolution in his novel, Tale of Two cities by cutting out and down playing certain events in the revolution even though his book is called Tale of Two Cities. Many important events of the French Revolution were omitted in his book, although not all. Charles Dickens also leaves out quite a lot of gory details that happened in the revolution such as executions and mob violence. He leaves out certain parts of the revolution because his story is a love story integrated into the French Revolution. Charles Dickens was trying to entertain the readers of the time by making a dramatic love story and not bore them with the exact details of the revolution. Another reason for altering the story of the French Revolution was that he was writing for a Victorian audience and they...

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This section contains 1,247 words
(approx. 5 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Student Essay on How Does Tale of Two Cities Romanticise the French Revolution?
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