The Great Gatsby Essay | Nick's Alienation in The Great Gatsby

This student essay consists of approximately 3 pages of analysis of Nick's Alienation in The Great Gatsby.
This section contains 847 words
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Nick's Alienation in The Great Gatsby

Summary: In The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald, Nick Carraway is alienated by class, creed, and gender. This essay explores how society creates its own rules and boundaries to define its citizens.
The Great Gatsby

Through class, creed, and gender, Nick Carraway, narrator of The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald is alienated by society, revealing its values and assumptions.

Nick Carraway is separated in society due to his class since society is composed of social classes, defined in part by its inhabitants. Carraway's neighbor, Gatsby, lives in a mansion described as ."..a colossal affair by any standard... with a tower on one side, spanking new under a thin beard of raw ivy, and a marble swimming pool and more than forth acres of lawn and garden." while Carraway's home "was an eyesore." Carraway lived in West Egg, the less fashionable of the two...at the very tip of the egg...squeezed between two huge places that rented for twelve or fifteen thousand a season." Society judges Carraway because of his home. He is also alienated...

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This section contains 847 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Student Essay on Nick's Alienation in The Great Gatsby
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