The House of the Seven Gables Essay | Judge Pynchion, Hawthorne, House of Seven Gables

This student essay consists of approximately 2 pages of analysis of Judge Pynchion, Hawthorne, House of Seven Gables.
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Judge Pynchion, Hawthorne, House of Seven Gables

Summary: Through use of detail, irony, and his sarcastic tone, Hawthorne is showing the reader the contempt he feels for Judge Pyncheon. He is letting the reader know that the Judge is far less than what the townspeople believe him to be.
In Nathaniel Hawthorns, The House of Seven Gables, Judge Pyncheon appears, in the public's perception, to be the model of austerity and morality, but these perceptions differ sharply from what Hawthorne suggests to us about the dark truths that such popular perceptions hide. Through his use of: "praiseworthy" detail; irony, illustrated by the Judges appearance; and his sarcastic tone; Hawthorne revels that Judge Pyncheon is a man capable of great cruelty.

Hawthorne goes into great detail about how wonderful the Judge is and how the community would be at a loss without him. Hawthorne goes on about his accomplishments and good deeds for eighteen lines, all the while, spewing a tone of sarcasm and distaste. "There was enough of splendid rubbish in his life to cover up and paralyze a more active a subtitle conscience than the Judge was ever troubled with." He...

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This section contains 491 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Student Essay on Judge Pynchion, Hawthorne, House of Seven Gables
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