A Tale of Two Cities Essay | Foreshadowing in A Tale of Two Cities

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Foreshadowing in A Tale of Two Cities

Summary: Charles Dickens uses the literary device of foreshadowing in A Tale of Two Cities to move the plot forward. Examples cited include Madame Defarge's knitting, Gaspard's murder of the Marquis, and most significantly, the breaking of the wine case.
Throughout A TALE OF TWO CITIES, Charles Dickens uses foreshadowing to further the plot of the novel. Dickens foreshadows the plot in a number of ways. One example of foreshadowing within the novel is Madame Defarge's knitting. Madame Defarge`s knitting foreshadows the upcoming revolution, in that she is knitting a register of people that she believes must be killed. Also, her knitting foreshadows the imprisonment of Charles Darnay, as well as the violence that will soon come.

In addition to the foreshadowing of Madame Defarge's knitting, Charles Dickens also foreshadows the revolution through the scenes involving the Marquis and Gaspard. After the Marquis carelessly kills Gaspard's child, Gaspard seeks revenge on the Marquis, by killing him. This event foreshadows the revolution in that Gaspard, symbolizing the lower class, revolts against the Marquis, representing the upper classes. The murder of the Marquis foreshadows...

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This section contains 446 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Student Essay on Foreshadowing in A Tale of Two Cities
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