One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest Essay | Chief Bromden Narrates One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest

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Chief Bromden Narrates One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest

Summary: In the novel, One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, the author, Ken Kesey, chose a patient suffering from schizophrenia to narrate the story that is based on Kesey's own experiences. The novel is seen through Chief Bromden and how he interprets the world he lives in, which he calls "The Combine."
In the novel, One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, the author, Ken Kesey, chose a patient suffering from schizophrenia to narrate the story that is based on Kesey's own experiences. The novel is seen through Chief Bromden and how he interprets the world he lives in, which he calls "the Combine." Bromden has a very observant eye and gives detailed descriptions. His peers' false assumption of Bromden's hearing gives Chief the ability to eavesdrop, revealing foreshadowing details. Although these characteristics make him a reliable source and a good narrator, because of Chief's hallucinations and paranoia, some of his opinions and visions are misleading. If the story were told through a sane character, such as Randal McMurphy, the distinction between reality and illusion would have been more lucid. Using Chief Bromden as a narrator puts limitations on the readers interpretations, but also...

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This section contains 1,413 words
(approx. 5 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Student Essay on Chief Bromden  Narrates One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest
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