Leviathan Essay | Hobbes' First Three Laws of Nature and the Fool's Objection

This student essay consists of approximately 5 pages of analysis of Hobbes' First Three Laws of Nature and the Fool's Objection.
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Hobbes' First Three Laws of Nature and the Fool's Objection

Summary: Thomas Hobbes begins The Leviathan by establishing the idea that all men are created equal, although every man perceives himself as smarter than the next. In response to the Third Law of Nature, Hobbes has an imaginary person called "the fool" make an objection to the third law of nature by claiming that covenant-keeping may turn out to be an irrational action.
Hobbes' First Three Laws of Nature and the Fool's Objection

Thomas Hobbes begins The Leviathan by establishing the idea that all men are created equal, although every man perceives himself as smarter than the next. As Hobbes says: "[men] will hardly believe there are many so wise as themselves; for they see their own wit at hand, and other men's at a distance" (25). He then argues for psychological egoism, describing mankind as driven by self-interest and, ultimately, only self-interest. This leads mankind to a constant state of war where human beings will pit themselves against each other in competition because "if any two men desire the same thing, which nevertheless they cannot both enjoy, they become enemies: (25). Hobbes explains that in a natural state of war, chaos ensues and man will do whatever is necessary to preserve their own lives...

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This section contains 1,488 words
(approx. 5 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Student Essay on Hobbes' First Three Laws of Nature and the Fool's Objection
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