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Essay | Greek Philosophy and Striving for Happiness in "Great Expectations"

This student essay consists of approximately 2 pages of analysis of Greek Philosophy and Striving for Happiness in "Great Expectations".
This section contains 573 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Student Essay on Greek Philosophy and Striving for Happiness in "Great Expectations"

Greek Philosophy and Striving for Happiness in "Great Expectations"

Summary: Greek philosphical thought on the nature of happiness and how it applies to Pip in Charles Dickens's "Great Expectations." Dickens stressed that happiness does not necessarily come from the places you expect, and Pip achieves happiness only when he lowers his expectations.
Reason, emotion, and appetite. These are the three sources of happiness, according to Plato. Synonymous with satisfaction and contentment, happiness can only come with having achieved a goal or made progress on one. Therefore, happiness does not come alone. Reason gives the most happiness, followed by emotion and then appetite. However, Plato did not include wealth as one of the factors of happiness. Charles Dickens' Great Expectations is a great example of this misconception. Its main character Pip is born a poor blacksmith who seeks to become a wealthy gentleman. Through his struggle to find happiness, Dickens shows that many people have the wrong idea of what will bring them joy, certain that fame or wealth is the most important, only to find out later that it did not matter to such an extent.

A common belief is that wealth is...

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This section contains 573 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Student Essay on Greek Philosophy and Striving for Happiness in "Great Expectations"
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