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Essay | "Othello" and Its Connection to Greek Tragedy

This student essay consists of approximately 3 pages of analysis of "Othello" and Its Connection to Greek Tragedy.
This section contains 759 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Student Essay on "Othello" and Its Connection to Greek Tragedy

"Othello" and Its Connection to Greek Tragedy

Summary: The play "Othello" is William Shakespeare's version of a classic Greek tragedy because it abides by Aristotle's definition of great tragedies; the tragedy would take place in one set place, in the course of a single day, and the play would consist of only a single story. Othello is a tragic hero whose demise is brought forth by his own tragic flaw, his jealousy of his wife Desdemona. His susceptibility to the manipulation of others due to his own insecurity ultimately leads to his irrational murder of Desdemona.

The play Othello is Shakespeare's own version of a classic Greek tragedy. A classical dramatic tragedy derives its essence from the ancient Greek plays that were often popular in Athens. These plays would typically consist of the downfall of a famous Greek character in history/legend, or the breakdown of a hero. Typically the hero is forced to struggle against overwhelming odds, and fate only that this characters downfall would be so imposing that regardless of these forces of nature and fate that destroy him, that he would rise and regain glory due to his moral victory. These tragedies would invoke terror and pity on the audience, in a sense a tragedy could be considered a form of a catharsis, literally cleansing the soul as it is performed, even though the horror typically disturbed audiences, at the same time it cleansed their soul...

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This section contains 759 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Student Essay on "Othello" and Its Connection to Greek Tragedy
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