Macbeth Essay | Macbeth, Aristotilean Tragedy?

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Macbeth, Aristotilean Tragedy?

Summary: Essay reviews Shakespeare's Macbeth in view of Aristotle's Poetics and his definition of a tragedy.
According to Aristotle, there are certain rules which make a tragedy what it is. After discussing the rules of an Aristotelian tragedy, we will try to learn whether Shakespeare's Macbeth is classified as such. We will find that although Macbeth is considered a tragedy among many people, it does not meet the requirements of an Aristotelian tragedy.

Aristotle's definition of a tragedy consists of several points. "A tragedy, then is the imitation of an action that is serious and also, as having magnitude, complete in itself; in language with pleasurable accessories, each kind brought in separately in the parts of the work; in a dramatic, not in a narrative form; with incidents arousing pity and fear, where-with to accomplish its catharsis of such emotions." (Introduction to Aristotle p 631) Aristotle also claims that a tragedy must have six parts, in order of importance: plot, character, thought, diction, melody...

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This section contains 1,453 words
(approx. 5 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Student Essay on Macbeth, Aristotilean Tragedy?
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