The Crucible Essay | Student Essay

This student essay consists of approximately 2 pages of analysis of The Crucible.
This section contains 563 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
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The Crucible

Summary: Reverend Hale was an example of a "crucible" because it seemed as though he could not survive the "heat" of the trials. Later in the play, it is made apparent that he is a sensible man and can remain rational even during times of severe testing or trial. I would say that Reverend Parris was the worst example of a "crucible" because he was a very austere and boring man. He was easily swayed by the crowd, only stopping to think how a situation could benefit him.
"The Crucible" Essay

A crucible is defined as "a vessel made of a refractory substance such as graphite or porcelain, used for melting and calcining materials at high temperatures" or "a severe test or trial."1 This play, being based on the Salem Witch Trials, obviously fits in well with the second definition. To compare the title to the first definition would be less obvious and more psychological. Many of the characters are, in a way, crucibles of their own, being tested by "heat" from the trials and the mass hysteria. They are brought to their "melting points."

John Proctor was a prime "crucible" in this play. John needed to put a stop to his affair without hurting anyone. He had to not only receive forgiveness from his wife, but also from himself. His involvement in the trials, defending others, and eventually being accused himself, was a major source...

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This section contains 563 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Student Essay on The Crucible
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