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Essay | Feminism in Dahl's "Lamb to the Slaughter"

This student essay consists of approximately 7 pages of analysis of Feminism in Dahl's "Lamb to the Slaughter".
This section contains 1,874 words
(approx. 7 pages at 300 words per page)
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Feminism in Dahl's "Lamb to the Slaughter"

Summary: A feminist explication of Roald Dahl's 1951 short story "Lamb to the Slaughter," in which a subservient housewife murders her husband upon hearing the news that he wants to leave her. After clubbing him in the head with a frozen leg of lamb, she cooks it and feeds it to the male detectives to dispose of the evidence.
In the socially stagnant post-war United States of the early 1950's, Mary Maloney is content with the routine she has established for herself as a homemaker. She spends each day anticipating the return of her husband, police officer Patrick Maloney. In this waiting period, she tidies up his house, prepares his food, and periodically glances at the clock until he arrives. For Mary Maloney, her husband's return is "always the most blissful time of day" (Dahl 24). Patrick's presence completes Mary, in that she is dependant on him both economically and emotionally.

In Roald Dahl's 1951 short story, "Lamb to the Slaughter," Mary Maloney comes to embody a feminist heroine by escaping her husband's oppression. Her behaviour in the beginning of the story is docile and therefore socially acceptable; she is the willing and conscientious housewife that all women should be. She has no choice...

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This section contains 1,874 words
(approx. 7 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Student Essay on Feminism in Dahl's "Lamb to the Slaughter"
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