To Kill a Mockingbird Essay | Coming of Age in to Kill a Mockingbird

This student essay consists of approximately 8 pages of analysis of Coming of Age in to Kill a Mockingbird.
This section contains 2,107 words
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Coming of Age in to Kill a Mockingbird

Summary: In the novel To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee, Jem, a ten-year-old boy, and Scout, a six-year-old girl, two children who live in the southern town Maycomb, Alabama, are shown in their adventures that help them mature. Jem and Scout gain much insight into the workings of the society in which they live through Tom Robinson's trial, and ultimately shed their childhood innocence at that point.
Coming of age comes with an inevitable end of childhood innocence, without which graduation into maturity cannot truly take place. In the novel To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee, Jem, a ten-year-old boy, and Scout, a six-year-old girl, two children who live in the southern town Maycomb, Alabama, are shown in their adventures that help them mature. During the years of the Great Depression - the years when this novel is set - racism had been an attitude many southerners followed. Atticus, Jem and Scout's father and also a respected lawyer, is appointed to take part in a controversial trial: he is to defend Tom Robinson, a poor negro laborer charged with raping Mayella Ewell, the nineteen year old daughter of the impoverished Bob Ewell. Jem and Scout are shown going through a tremendous amount of growing up in this novel...

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This section contains 2,107 words
(approx. 8 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Student Essay on Coming of Age in to Kill a Mockingbird
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