The Great Gatsby Essay | The Great Gatsby

This student essay consists of approximately 7 pages of analysis of The Great Gatsby.
This section contains 2,054 words
(approx. 7 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Student Essay on The Great Gatsby

The Great Gatsby

Summary: This essay is about F. Scott Fitzgerald's "The Great Gatsby."
Author F. Scott Fitzgerald invokes many themes from ancient Greek tragedy in The Great Gatsby: primary character Jay Gatsby rises as he makes a large fortune for himself. He then has the power he so desires, namely the love of Daisy, within his grasp. Gatsby has a fatal flaw, which causes him to lose everything when he lets his best chance to have Daisy slip away. Another key element of classical Greek tragedies is that they are meant to evoke pity within the audience; the punishment must exceed the crime. Clearly, Jay Gatsby is meant to be pitied- he is a man who must die simply because of his love for Daisy. Furthermore, Greek tragedies are meant to inspire fear within their audience. By viewing Gatsby's quest for Daisy as a metaphor for the American man trying to achieve the American Dream, the reader sees that F...

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This section contains 2,054 words
(approx. 7 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Student Essay on The Great Gatsby
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