To Kill a Mockingbird Essay | The "Mockingbirds" in To Kill a Mockingbird

This student essay consists of approximately 4 pages of analysis of The "Mockingbirds" in To Kill a Mockingbird.
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The "Mockingbirds" in To Kill a Mockingbird

Summary: The title of Harper Lee's novel To Kill a Mockingbird is significant in that while it is considered a sin to kill a mockingbird, characters in the story resemble mockingbirds that have indeed been "killed." Atticus Finch, Tom Robinson, and Boo Radley are all characters whose experiences in the novel strongly identify with the title; Atticus because he is criticized for defending Tom; Tom because he is a victim of racial prejudice; and Boo because he is a victim of stereotyping.

It is a sin to kill a mockingbird as they don't do one thing but sing their hearts out for us. However, there are many "mockingbirds" that are "killed" in, "To Kill a mockingbird, by Harper Lee." The title of this book (To Kill a Mockingbird) is very significant and can be applied to many characters. Atticus, Tom Robinson, and Boo Radley are characters that can be strongly identified with the title.

First, Atticus Finch can be strongly applied to the title. Many citizens of Maycomb were very angry at him just because he was defending a black man, Tom Robinson. Kids at school were even calling him a "nigger lover." Cecil Jacobs says, "My folks said your daddy was a disgrace an' that nigger oughta hang from the water-tank!" (Lee, pg76) Atticus is doing nothing more than doing his job and defending...

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This section contains 927 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Student Essay on The "Mockingbirds" in To Kill a Mockingbird
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