In a Station of the Metro Essay | Essay

This student essay consists of approximately 3 pages of analysis of "In a Station of the Metro" by Ezra Pound.
This section contains 776 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Student Essay on "In a Station of the Metro" by Ezra Pound

"In a Station of the Metro" by Ezra Pound

Summary: An analysis of Ezra Pound's poem "In a Station of the Metro." Written in haiku and describing the presence of unexpected beauty in a city environment, the poem displays how Pound went beyond the limits of using standard imagery by evoking the spontaneous reaction of sensory and mental association.
Ezra Pound, the founder of imagism, was born in Hailey, Idaho, on October 30th, 1885 (Flory 308). Growing up in Philadelphia, Ezra Pound knew at fifteen what he wanted to do; he wanted to become a poet ("How"). In additon to his writings, he defriended and assisited many of the greatest writers of his time with their careers: T. S. Eliot, William Carlos Williams, James Joyce, Robert Frost, and Ernest Hemingway (Flory 308). In 1913, he published Contemprania, a group of imagistic poems that included the popular "In a Station of the Metro," stripping away his formerly archaic vocabulary and simplifying his verses (Flory 315). In Des Imagistes, an thology of imagistice poems, Pound emphasized that imagists were committed to the direct treatment of the image whether it is subjective or objective (Alexander 280). Using brevity and exact words, "In a Station of the Metro" reveals an epiphany and presents an unusual connection to...

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This section contains 776 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Student Essay on "In a Station of the Metro" by Ezra Pound
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