Emma Essay | Student Essay

This student essay consists of approximately 2 pages of analysis of Wit and Irony in Chapter 12 of "Emma".
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Wit and Irony in Chapter 12 of "Emma"

Summary: In Chapter 12 of Jane Austen's "Emma," the author uses humor, from the subtle to the absurd, to describe the holiday party attended by the Knightlys and the Woodhouses. The scene reveals the characters' personalities and motivations.
The scene delivered in Chapter 12 of Jane Austen's "Emma" contains Mr Knightly, Mr & Mrs John Knightly and Mr & Miss Woodhouse. Although this scene is not hilarious, Austen's dry, laconic wit juxtaposed with the seasonal backdrop creates an ironic and minutely observed sequence of events.

The very beginning of the chapter is humorous as Emma admits she would try to reconcile herself to Mr Knightly, but she will not accept any blame. This tells the reader that she is headstrong, stubborn and symmetrically, Mr Knightly is similarly disposed.

I find the comments made by Emma regarding herself tasteless, and wholly inappropriate for the Christmas occasion, "Little Emma, grow up a better woman than your aunt. Be infinitely cleverer, and not half so conceited." Whilst this is a humorous device, (and one can argue that Emma is trying to defuse the tense atmosphere), it makes...

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This section contains 580 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Student Essay on Wit and Irony in Chapter 12 of "Emma"
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