The Bluest Eye Essay | The Symbolism of Dolls in "The Bluest Eye"

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The Symbolism of Dolls in "The Bluest Eye"

Summary: In "The Bluest Eye," Toni Morrison writes about her frustration about why she doesn't see why dolls are likeable. This is symbolic of the anger she feels about racial differences, especially between white and black girls of the same age.
In The Bluest Eye, Toni Morrison uses a tone of frustration and mild anger towards dolls, but more specifically, towards racial differences. Morrison is frustrated as she is trying "too see of what it was made, to discover the dearness, to find the beauty, the desirability that had escaped me, but apparently only me" (Morrison). She is frustrated and confused about what is so likeable about the dolls. Morrison is trying to discover the beauty that appeals to everyone else. In the big picture, this represents how she is not able to understand why there is a difference between white girls and black girls of the same age. Her frustration is also shown when she says, "The big, the special, the loving gift was always a big, blue-eyed Baby Doll" (Morrison). Morrison is frustrated and angry at the fact that the lovable...

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This section contains 246 words
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Buy the Student Essay on The Symbolism of Dolls in "The Bluest Eye"
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