Medea Essay | Student Essay

This student essay consists of approximately 6 pages of analysis of The Psychology behind Medea.
This section contains 1,776 words
(approx. 6 pages at 300 words per page)
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The Psychology behind Medea

Summary: The psychology of Medea, the title character in the famous Greek poem by Euripides, is a passionate, prideful woman whose relationship conflicts reveal that her true conflicts lie within her. This is manifested in how her idealized image of honor and power contrasts with her actual self and her aggressive-expansive solutions.
Medea, a main character from Euripides's Medea, is a passionate, prideful woman who has conflicts in her relationships with people. However, Medea's true conflicts lie within her, concerning how her idealized image of honor and power contrasts with her actual self. Her conflicts cause her to have reactions to her idealized image, such as a search for glory, "shoulds," claims, neurotic pride, and ultimately, self-hate. Medea's self-hate causes her to develop an aggressive-expansive solution.

Medea's aggressive-expansive solution develops to try to work out her inner conflicts against her idealized image. In Medea's case, her idealized image is to be honored and respected. She wants to be all-powerful and feared by others for her powers. She also wishes to achieve fame and have others recognize her as physically attractive, especially by Jason. However, this is not who she really is. Medea's real self has the potential power...

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This section contains 1,776 words
(approx. 6 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Student Essay on The Psychology behind Medea
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