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Essay | Childhood Lonlieness in Ender's Game and Indian Killer

This student essay consists of approximately 4 pages of analysis of Childhood Lonlieness in Ender's Game and Indian Killer.
This section contains 980 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Student Essay on Childhood Lonlieness in Ender's Game and Indian Killer

Childhood Lonlieness in Ender's Game and Indian Killer

Summary: Childhood loneliness is a considerable problem that can affect young children in many ways, and may have long-term negative consequences. In the novels, Indian Killer, by Sherman Alexie, and Ender's Game, but Orson Scott Card, the powerful portrayal of childhood loneliness is overwhelming. Some instances are quite obvious while others are a little harder to see.
Childhood Loneliness

Childhood loneliness is a considerable problem that can affect young children in many ways, and may have long-term negative consequences. In the novels, Indian Killer, by Sherman Alexie, and Ender's Game, but Orson Scott Card, the powerful portrayal of childhood loneliness is overwhelming.

After years of being monitored by government officials, Ender Wiggins, the main character of Orson Scott Card's Ender's Game, finds himself completely alone. The loneliness set's in as he finds himself in a new school, away from the watchful eyes of the government and bared to the world. He is a Third. This feeling of being a third makes Ender feel even more isolated, "It was not his fault he was a Third. It was the government's idea, they were the ones who authorized it - how else could a Third like Ender have got into school...

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This section contains 980 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Student Essay on Childhood Lonlieness in Ender's Game and Indian Killer
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