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Essay | Arthur Dimmesdale's Guilty Pleasures

This student essay consists of approximately 3 pages of analysis of Arthur Dimmesdale's Guilty Pleasures.
This section contains 636 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Student Essay on Arthur Dimmesdale's Guilty Pleasures

Arthur Dimmesdale's Guilty Pleasures

Summary: As Hester Prynne's secret lover, Arthur Dimmesdale tortures himself physically and psychologically because of the guilt he endures in his heart. In the end this torture weakens him. In The Scarlet Letter, the three scaffold scenes help maximize the guilt inside of Arthur Dimmesdale and help him suffer the consequences inside as Hester does on the outside.
Picture it: Boston, Massachusetts. In the middle of the 17th century, a woman is accused of adultery and the norm of punishment is death, but this woman lives. Her punishment becomes public showings, the guilt of carrying around her child forever, and the exhibition of the scarlet letter A on her chest. Nathaniel Hawthorne uses ambiguity to display elements of Romanticism such as the journey archetype of Hester Prynne trying to find herself in the world she lives in and the use of nature in a symbolic way, especially when the light shines on Hester. As Hester Prynne's secret lover, Arthur Dimmesdale tortures himself physically and psychologically because of the guilt he endures in his heart. In the end this torture weakens him. In The Scarlet Letter, the three scaffold scenes help maximize the guilt inside of Arthur Dimmesdale and help him suffer the consequences inside...

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This section contains 636 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Student Essay on Arthur Dimmesdale's Guilty Pleasures
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