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Essay | "Rotten" Claudius in Hamlet

This student essay consists of approximately 5 pages of analysis of "Rotten" Claudius in Hamlet.
This section contains 1,335 words
(approx. 5 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Student Essay on "Rotten" Claudius in Hamlet

"Rotten" Claudius in Hamlet

Summary: The "incestuous [and] adulterate beast" of Claudius is the evil behind the famous phrase "something is rotten in Denmark" in William Shakespeare's "Hamlet." His evil acts are a "disease" he spreads to his loved ones, causing death and destruction to occur in this famous tragic play.
In Shakespeare's Hamlet, there is much skepticism as to what exactly is "rotten in Denmark." Claudius, the "incestuous [and] adulterate beast," essentially adopts this title as he exists as the root of all evil within the play (1.5.42). Claudius acquires a "rotten" disease through the murder of King Hamlet. Not only has Claudius killed King Hamlet but also proceeds to steal his throne and wife. Shakespeare insinuates that the stimulation of Claudius' disease comes from greed and lust. Claudius ambiguously rules the kingdom of Denmark while living a life of lies and corruption. His lies infect the life of his wife, Queen Gertrude, which in turn directly affects Prince Hamlet. The sickening plague continues through Polonius, Laertes and lastly to Ophelia who are all greatly deceived by the King. Claudius' detrimental decisions stimulate a debilitating disease that contaminates every person close to the villainous king.

King Hamlet's...

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This section contains 1,335 words
(approx. 5 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Student Essay on "Rotten" Claudius in Hamlet
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