Animal Farm Essay | Elements in George Orwell's "Animal Farm"

This student essay consists of approximately 4 pages of analysis of Elements in George Orwell's "Animal Farm".
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Elements in George Orwell's "Animal Farm"

Summary: Animal Farm has many mimetic qualities. One such quality is demonstrated in the use of symbolism. The animals, representing people, overthrow their authority. This is similar to the situation in the Russian Revolution. The people followed Lenin and overthrew the czar, the same as the animals overthrew Mr. Jones.
Animal Farm, written by George Orwell, depicts a group of animals who plot to destroy their master, Mr. Jones. The oldest and wisest pig on the farm, "Old Major," told the other animals a story about a revolt called, "The Rebellion." The pigs, which were considered to be the most intelligent of all the animals, devised a plan and successfully conquered Manor Farm. The animals ran the farm effectively, with the pigs overseeing and constantly developing new ideas. One pig, Snowball, was in favor of the improvements of the farm, while another pig, Napoleon, was seeking only personal success. They were both adamant about their viewpoints and often argued. When Snowball introduced a new plan to build a windmill, Napoleon disagreed and convinced the animals that snowball had ulterior motives, and that he should be banished from Animal Farm. The animals followed...

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This section contains 1,137 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Student Essay on Elements in George Orwell's "Animal Farm"
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