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Essay | Unifying Themes in J.D. Salinger's Works

This student essay consists of approximately 4 pages of analysis of Unifying Themes in J.D. Salinger's Works.
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Unifying Themes in J.D. Salinger's Works

Summary: J.D. Salinger's books The Catcher in the Rye, Franny and Zooey, and Nine Stories all reveal facets of Salinger's mysterious, cynical personality. All three works indicate Salinger's apparent quest for enlightenment or happiness, his efforts to separate religion from egoism in a society he sees as corrupt, and his voluntary withdrawal from that society.
Upon reading The Catcher in the Rye, Franny and Zooey, and Nine Stories, it is obvious that they have been written by the same man, J.D. Salinger. In each work, Salinger reveals a new facet of his own mysterious person. Today, Salinger lives as a recluse, writing only for himself and avoiding the press. Consequently, the only access to his unusual character is through his books and short stories. The typical Salinger work is a quest for enlightenment or happiness, supported by intricate symbolism and sprinkled with religious ideas.

Salinger's magnum opus, The Catcher in the Rye, follows an adolescent, Holden Caulfield, on his search for his identity. Holden tries on various identities, mostly concerning his sexuality, on his struggle to break into the adult world. He wears a distinguishing red "hunting hat" as he searches. He breaks down and the book...

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This section contains 1,027 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Student Essay on Unifying Themes in J.D. Salinger's Works
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