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Essay | The Ambivalence of Macbeth

This student essay consists of approximately 3 pages of analysis of The Ambivalence of Macbeth.
This section contains 809 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Student Essay on The Ambivalence of Macbeth

The Ambivalence of Macbeth

Summary: In William Shakespeare's tragedy "Macbeth," the title character encounters great ambivalence in deciding whether to appease his conscience or to satiate his lust for power. The most significant display of this ambivalence is in Act I, Scene VII, in which Shakespeare effectively uses literary devices such as diction, imagery, and structure to portray Macbeth's indecisiveness over whether or not to kill King Duncan.
Ambivalence, as defined by Miriam Webster's Dictionary is a state of indecisiveness categorized by conflicting emotions or feelings. William Shakespeare's Tragedy, Macbeth, engenders many such internal battles; none of which is greater than that of the title character, Lord Macbeth, as found in Act I, Scene VII. Macbeth's diction and imagery reveal his struggle to make a firm decision regarding the fate of his king through his dilemma between appeasing his conscience and satiating his lust for power.

The language in Macbeth's soliloquy showcases the doubts already in his mind about murdering his royal guest, King Duncan. Before coming away from a dinner party with his majesty, Macbeth has already discussed the likelihood of assassination earlier on within the play, but now he feels morally troubled and much less certain about taking such a course of action. He, in all his fervor, enumerates all reasons to...

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This section contains 809 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Student Essay on The Ambivalence of Macbeth
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