The Adventures of Tom Sawyer Essay | The Value System Espoused in The Adventures of Tom Sawyer

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The Value System Espoused in The Adventures of Tom Sawyer

Summary: In his novel The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Mark Twain portrays the title character as a mischievious boy who nonetheless has a strong moral conscience and a good heart. In describing Tom's actions, both those of mischief and those of responsibility, Twain espouses a value system to the reader. In this system, even a mischievious boy should be able to make mature, responsible decisions; and all our deeds have consequences, whether they take the form of punishment or of praise.
Tom Sawyer is a boy who is always finding himself in some kind of mischief, yet he somehow manages to keep himself from being punished, and rather seem like a hero. He is always in and out of trouble, but despite his mischief, Tom is a boy with a strong moral conscience and a good heart.

One example of Tom having a good heart is where Tom takes the blame for Becky when she tore Mr. Dobbin's book. It is not right to lie about something or keep quite when you know who the sinner is, but Tom was noble enough to take punishment for Becky, because he liked her so much, and that made Tom a hero, Becky's hero.

In the beginning of the novel, Tom wishes that he could have the lifestyle that "Huckleberry Finn" has. Huckleberry has...

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This section contains 567 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Student Essay on The Value System Espoused in The Adventures of Tom Sawyer
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