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Essay | Pygmalion - Making Ms. Right

This student essay consists of approximately 4 pages of analysis of Pygmalion.
This section contains 1,123 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Student Essay on Pygmalion - Making Ms. Right

Pygmalion - Making Ms. Right

Summary: This essay is about the similarities and differences between Pygmalion, the book by George Bernard Shaw and the film directed Anthony Asquith and Leslie Howard. Describes how Specific film elements are used to give the audience the same effect that a reader would have reading the play.
According to Greek mythology, Pygmalion was a man who strongly detested women and resolved to live the rest of his life unmarried. He used his skill at sculpting to fabricate his perfect woman, Galatea. He admired his life-like work so much that he fell in love with Galatea. George Bernard Shaw used this ancient Greek myth to write the play Pygmalion in 1916. Anthony Asquith and Leslie Howard directed the 1938 film version of Shaw's play. Lipscomb and Lewis' screenplay adequately depicts the play's central theme that "class distinctions are purely based on social constructs" (Kendrick [ ]). Shaw also contributes greatly to the screenplay, which helps the movie adaptation "capture all of the charm, wit, and sophistication of the stage hit" (Puccio [ ]).

In Shaw's original play Henry Higgins, a phonetics professor, bets Col. Pickering, a linguist, that he can take an ordinary flower girl, Eliza Doolittle, and fool...

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This section contains 1,123 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Student Essay on Pygmalion - Making Ms. Right
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