Medea Essay | Student Essay

This student essay consists of approximately 2 pages of analysis of Women and Violence in Euripides' Play "Medea".
This section contains 539 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
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Women and Violence in Euripides' Play "Medea"

Summary: Though the heroine in Euripides' tradedy Medea is intelligent and clever, her abilities are hampered by the fact that she is a woman. Her brutality and hostility reveal the extremes women had to go to in ancient Greece to liberate themselves from subordinate roles.
The scenes of violence in Euripides play "Medea" contributes greatly to the overall meaning of the work. During the era of the ancient Greeks, women were oppressed and forced to be subordinate to men, despite the fact Greece claimed to be a land of freedom and democracy. The character Medea is intelligent and clever, but her abilities are hampered by the fact that she is a woman. Medea is far from a role model for her brutal actions during the play, but her hostility exists in order to provide evidence for the ways that women had to go to extreme measures to liberate themselves from their subordinate roles.

Medea is an extremist who willingly gave up everything she knew for her husband Jason, betraying her father, her brother and her country in the process. Shortly after she and Jason returned to Greece, however...

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This section contains 539 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Student Essay on Women and Violence in Euripides' Play "Medea"
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