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Essay | The Macbeths: Sources of Their Own Downfall

This student essay consists of approximately 4 pages of analysis of The Macbeths.
This section contains 1,084 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Student Essay on The Macbeths: Sources of Their Own Downfall

The Macbeths: Sources of Their Own Downfall

Summary: William Shakespeare's Macbeth and Lady Macbeth are the victims of their own unmitigated ambition. Their undoing is self-inflicted, caused by feelings of guilt. Self-control is the key to restraining detrimental ambition.
Strength of Character

Macbeth and Lady Macbeth are the perfect paradigms of characters whose downfalls are self inflicted, whether intentional or not. They prove that guilt has the ability to prick upon one's soul and cause one's own downfall. Macbeth and Lady Macbeth do not have the strength of character to ignore their guilt, but rather their consciences, forever soiled with the sin of murder, eat away at their souls. Throughout Macbeth, the representation of blood and hallucinations (motivated by guilt) cause the Macbeths to expose their sins, which of course is their own undoing. Once Macbeth begins to plot and accomplish Duncan's murder, remorse and guilt begin their own murder, only this time to the downfall of the guilty parties themselves. The first twinges of regret bring forth hallucinations of Banquo, metaphorical symbolism of unwashable hands, and a flying dagger, all adding...

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This section contains 1,084 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Student Essay on The Macbeths: Sources of Their Own Downfall
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