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Essay | Symbolism in The Great Gatsby

This student essay consists of approximately 2 pages of analysis of Symbolism in The Great Gatsby.
This section contains 483 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Student Essay on Symbolism in The Great Gatsby

Symbolism in The Great Gatsby

Summary: Discusses F. Scott Fitzgerald's classic novel, The Great Gatsby. Explains symbolism in The Great Gatsby. Describes how the use of symbolism helps enhance the readers understanding in the novel.
As many authors tend to do, symbolism is used a great deal in this work. In F. Scott Fitzgerald's novel The Great Gatsby, this is no exception. The author employs dramatically significant symbols in his novel.

One reoccurring symbol in The Great Gatsby is the East verses the West. The East represents old money where as the west represents new money. People from the East tend to be more sophisticated and hypocritical while people from the west tend to be more natural and honest. In The Great Gatsby, inhabitants of East Egg do not normally easily accept people living in West Egg and vice versa. Being from East Egg, when at a party at Gatsby's house in West Egg, Daisy hands out "green cards", implying that people needed permission to go to East Egg. "She [Daisy] was appalled by West Egg ... by its raw vigor...

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This section contains 483 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Student Essay on Symbolism in The Great Gatsby
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