Iliad Essay | The Theme of Divine Intervention in Homer's Illiad

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The Theme of Divine Intervention in Homer's Illiad

Summary: Discusses Homer introducing the theme of divine intervention in the Illiad through different mediums. Reveals how Homer incorporated many of the ideals of ancient Greek society into the tale.
The Theme of Divine Intervention in the Iliad

In the annals of classical literature, especially in works of tragedy and poetry, the gods intervene at the end of the work to resolve the main conflict. In the Iliad, however, the gods take sides in the war, spread discord among mortals and immortals during the work, and actually start the war.

Before the start of the war, there were correlations between the major characters even before the story began. The parents of Achilles, the major character in the epic, Peleus and Thetis, were married, and the gods held a wedding feast in their honor (Balme and Morwood 47). The goddess Eris was not invited, and as a result, she stormed into the banquet and flung down a golden apple. The gods were asked to judge to find the most beautiful goddess. Zeus decided that the task should be delegated to a mortal...

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This section contains 1,195 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Student Essay on The Theme of Divine Intervention in Homer's Illiad
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