To Kill a Mockingbird Essay | The Moral Growth of the Children in to Kill a Mockingbird

This student essay consists of approximately 3 pages of analysis of The Moral Growth of the Children in to Kill a Mockingbird.
This section contains 881 words
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The Moral Growth of the Children in to Kill a Mockingbird

Summary: Examines the moral and spiritual growth of both Scout and Jem, the children in Harper Lee's novel To Kill a Mockingbird. Demonstrates how each of the children changed their attitudes towards the true meaning of courage.
Harper Lee's Bildungsroman, To Kill A Mockingbird, centres on the moral growth of the two main characters, Scout and Jem. Over the course of the novel, the children learn many lessons about the world they live in -1930's rural Alabama. As well as the overwhelming racial prejudice and narrow-minded attitudes of the setting, Scout and Jem learn about courage - a theme central to the novel. At the beginning of the novel, the children have a very stereotypical, masculine sense of courage. They only feel proud of their father when he performs "masculine" tasks, such as shooting. However, through some of their experiences they begin to learn that courage may not be the same as their original beliefs. When Mrs Dubose, an elderly lady, dies; they learn she has been fighting for her life for a long time...

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This section contains 881 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Student Essay on The Moral Growth of the Children in to Kill a Mockingbird
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