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Essay | The Bluest Eye: A Character Analysis of Pecola

This student essay consists of approximately 6 pages of analysis of The Bluest Eye.
This section contains 1,532 words
(approx. 6 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Student Essay on The Bluest Eye: A Character Analysis of Pecola

The Bluest Eye: A Character Analysis of Pecola

Summary: This essay analyzes the character Pecola from African American author Toni Morrison's novel The Bluest Eye. Uses key passages to demonstrate Pecola's descent into madness.
"Dandelions. Why do people call them weeds? I think they're pretty. Nobody loves the head of a dandelion" (Morrison 35). "They are ugly. They are weeds" (Morrison 38). Pecola, the main character from the novel The Bluest Eye, by Toni Morrison, compares herself to the dandelions: ugly and unwanted. Pecola is raised with no sense of self-esteem or self-value. She is a black girl with nappy hair and dark eyes. She yearns for blue eyes, the mark of beauty in the United States during the 1940s. She lives a life of tumult and ugliness. Pecola portrays happier versions of her life through the imaginary character, Jane. Pecola is a very static character who changes very little throughout the book.

"Here is the house. It is green and white. It has a red door. It is very pretty" (Morrison 24). The Breedloves live in a shack...

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This section contains 1,532 words
(approx. 6 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Student Essay on The Bluest Eye: A Character Analysis of Pecola
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