Sacred and Profane Imagery in Donne's "To His Mistress Going to Bed" Essay | Sacred and Profane Imagery in Donne's "To His Mistress Going to Bed"

This student essay consists of approximately 4 pages of analysis of Sacred and Profane Imagery in Donne's "To His Mistress Going to Bed".
This section contains 907 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
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Sacred and Profane Imagery in Donne's "To His Mistress Going to Bed"

Summary: An exploration of Donne's use of sacred and profane imagery in "To His Mistress Going To Bed".
Donne's use of sacred and profane imagery in "To His Mistress Going to Bed" can be considered at times reckless, bordering on the boundary of blasphemy. However, it is also an example of Donne's genius, in that he used complex images of exotic religions and earthly lust to get his message across.

Throughout the poem, Donne makes reference to many parts of Greek mythology, thought by many to be exotic, and its gods, thought to indulge in Earthly pleasures, unlike the one God of the Catholic belief. Two main myths appear in the poem - the story of Atalanta and Melanion, and Aphrodite's girdle. Atalanta was a virgin huntress who promised that she would marry any man who could beat her in a race, but those whom she defeated would be killed - essentially a battle of the...

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This section contains 907 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Student Essay on Sacred and Profane Imagery in Donne's "To His Mistress Going to Bed"
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