Plato Essay | Plato: Divine Commands Can Never be Genuinely Moral Commands

This student essay consists of approximately 3 pages of analysis of Plato.
This section contains 822 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Student Essay on Plato: Divine Commands Can Never be Genuinely Moral Commands

Plato: Divine Commands Can Never be Genuinely Moral Commands

Summary: Answers the question of why Plato argues that divine commands can never be genuinely moral commands. Discusses the divine nature of God and whether morality exists independently of God.
From the Euthyphro dilemma, Plato argues that divine commands can never be genuinely moral. The divine commands are those belonging or coming from God. This argument stems from the idea that because God is omnipotent, omniscient that he will punish us when he detects any failures. Thus suggesting that the fear that motivates us to follow such divine commands is not a suitable motive to a certain moral action. Another argument that Plato presents is that God sets such divine commands because they are moral which raises the idea that morality exists as an entity separate to God. Both these ideas suggest that the divine command is not genuinely moral as they are acted upon in the interest of the individual and questions the motives of moral actions.

In Plato's argument, he addressees the motives of our moral actions. Since God...

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This section contains 822 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Student Essay on Plato: Divine Commands Can Never be Genuinely Moral Commands
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