The Great Gatsby Essay | F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby: the Negative Affect of Obsessions

This student essay consists of approximately 4 pages of analysis of F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby.
This section contains 1,069 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Student Essay on F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby: the Negative Affect of Obsessions

F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby: the Negative Affect of Obsessions

Summary: An essay examining how obession can eventually lead to a characters downfall as in "The Great Gatsby."
Life, amid other things, is filled with opulence and manifestation. It is likely that one always craves for the quintessential life, but if one obsesses over this, it could be perilous. A single-minded obsession obtained as a primary dream is fed by the extreme habitual yearning for a greater more dignified place in American Society. Therefore one can never stop for a concise moment in time and see the true purpose of one's existence. The father of Existentialism, Jean-Paul Sartre believed that "Existence precedes essence" and humans are alone in the universe. This philosophy ties in with F. Scott Fitzgerald's novel, The Great Gatsby. The protagonist, Jay Gatsby, tries to accomplish his own American dream of the 1920's. This dream becomes a fixation for Gatsby and is all that he lives for. The chronic vision that he strives for...

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This section contains 1,069 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Student Essay on F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby: the Negative Affect of Obsessions
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F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby: the Negative Affect of Obsessions from BookRags Student Essays. (c)2014 BookRags, Inc. All rights reserved.
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