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Essay | The Peculiar Institution & Uncle Tom's Cabin

This student essay consists of approximately 9 pages of analysis of The Peculiar Institution & Uncle Tom's Cabin.
This section contains 2,615 words
(approx. 9 pages at 300 words per page)
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The Peculiar Institution & Uncle Tom's Cabin

Summary: This is a very detailed and in depth essay about the novel "Uncle Tom's Cabin" that answers specific questions relating to the Treatment of Slaves, the Rationalizations for Slavery, the Arguments against Slavery, the Establishments that Perpetuated Slavery, What Motivated Slaves to Seek Freedom, Reasons for Slaves to Fail to Rebel, Behavior in Bondage and Stowe's View of Slavery.
Harriet Beecher Stowe's melodramatic novel, Uncle Tom's Cabin, which she called in the preface a "series of sketches", was written "to awaken sympathy and feeling for the African race" (Stowe "Preface"). It was so successful as a polemic against slavery that Lincoln gently called Mrs. Stowe "the little lady who started this big war" (Hughes "Introduction"). Stowe wrote from the point of view of an abolitionist, a Christian and a Northerner from a state that bordered the slave-owning South.

I. The Treatment of Slaves

It would be an exaggeration to say that all slaves were mistreated physically, and Stowe makes the point that some states were more disposed to treat slaves decently than others. Haley, the trader, comments that "You Kentucky folks spile your niggers" (Stowe, UTC Chapter 1, p.7). The farms of Kentucky offered a moderate climate and a more bearable workload than, for...

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This section contains 2,615 words
(approx. 9 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Student Essay on The Peculiar Institution & Uncle Tom's Cabin
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