Beowulf Essay | "Kindest to Kinfolk Yet Keenest for Fame"

Gareth Hinds
This student essay consists of approximately 4 pages of analysis of "Kindest to Kinfolk Yet Keenest for Fame".
This section contains 1,171 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Student Essay on "Kindest to Kinfolk Yet Keenest for Fame"

"Kindest to Kinfolk Yet Keenest for Fame"

Summary: This essay seeks to show that the final line of the epic "Beowulf" relates to the whole poem in terms of the tension between the roles of hero and king.


Over the course of the poem, Beowulf transitions from a heroic warrior to a noble king. The last lines of the epic, "kindest to kinfolk yet keenest for fame" undoubtedly refers to the transitions of roles the main character undergoes, as well as the differing values and responsibilities accompanying each role. Time and again in the poem the major themes of what makes a good king and what makes a good hero are presented. As both a warrior and a king, Beowulf must reconcile the opposing values and duties of each position in society. This essay seeks to show that the final line of the epic relates to the whole poem in terms of the tension between the roles of hero and king.

In order to explain how the final lines relate to the tension of trying to reconcile the positions...

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This section contains 1,171 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Student Essay on "Kindest to Kinfolk Yet Keenest for Fame"
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