To Kill a Mockingbird Essay | Victims in "To Kill a Mockingbird"

This student essay consists of approximately 3 pages of analysis of Victims in "To Kill a Mockingbird".
This section contains 694 words
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Victims in "To Kill a Mockingbird"

Summary: Essay explores the victims in Harper Lee's "To Kill a Mockingbird."
Crooks, Curly's wife, Candy and Lennie, are all characters who were victimized during the American Depression in John Steinbecks 1930's novella, "Of mice and Men." These characters are discriminated against and ridiculed for their race, mental state, sex or age. The farm, on which the story takes place, could be considered a microcosm of the world. This story shows us how discrimination was present and dealt with during American Depression.

Crooks' role of importance in the story was to represent the racism of the microcosm of the society. Throughout the Western states of America in the 1930s' racism was common and was not hidden behind any other act as some other forms of discrimination. Consequently, in the story racism is the most blatant and clear act of discrimination on the farm. Crooks was one of four victims in the story, but unlike...

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This section contains 694 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Student Essay on Victims in "To Kill a Mockingbird"
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