King Lear Essay | Parental Nearsightedness in "King Lear"

This student essay consists of approximately 6 pages of analysis of Parental Nearsightedness in "King Lear".
This section contains 1,577 words
(approx. 6 pages at 300 words per page)
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Parental Nearsightedness in "King Lear"

Summary: This essay proves how Lear and Gloucester's nearsightedness of their children's behavior leads to social and political disorder in Shakespeare's "King Lear."
Parents are often unaware of the capabilities of their children. As a result, they may be oblivious to the wrongdoing that their children may commit. In William Shakespeare's play King Lear (Lr.) a king gives power to his daughters because he is getting old, bringing the kingdom into a state of frenzy. Two parents in particular make the mistake of giving power to their evil and power-hungry offspring. This blindness, which is portrayed by the characters of Lear, the former king, and Gloucester, a former political leader, leads to disorder. Shakespeare's characters demonstrate how parental nearsightedness leads to decline in power, as well as social disorder.

Lear's parental nearsightedness causes his decline in power, and ultimately political disorder. Because Lear gives power to Goneril and Regan, his daughters, their kingdom of England experiences violent and corrupt rule. He enthusiastically makes them rulers, which is an...

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This section contains 1,577 words
(approx. 6 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Student Essay on Parental Nearsightedness in "King Lear"
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