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Essay | Sailing to Byzantium - William Butler Yeats

This student essay consists of approximately 3 pages of analysis of Sailing to Byzantium.
This section contains 661 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Student Essay on Sailing to Byzantium - William Butler Yeats

Sailing to Byzantium - William Butler Yeats

Summary: Sailing to Byzantium by William Butler Yeats, is an inspired poem in which Yeats thoroughly examines his personal struggle with the agony of old age.
The main themes in Sailing to Byzantium is the contacts between Yeats' ageing body and youthful mind, and his desire to achieve a permanence not possible in reality. Yeats is seeking escape from the human body into the world of Byzantium which represents artistic magnificence and permanence, however by the end of the poem Yeats realizes that intellect is limited by the human condition.

In opening stanza of Sailing to Byzantium Yeats states, "This is no country for old men"(1), immediately presenting his preoccupation with old age. The stanza continues by painting a picture of teaming life, the would of youth, vitality, reproduction. However, Yeats quickly counters the images of life and vigor with the line, "Whatever is begotten, born, dies"(6). Suggesting that despite the happiness of youth, they are all condemned to die. He then goes on to say, "Caught in that...

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This section contains 661 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Student Essay on Sailing to Byzantium - William Butler Yeats
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