Harlem Renaissance Essay | Harlem Resaissance Response to the Oral Tradition

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Harlem Resaissance Response to the Oral Tradition

Summary: Provides an analysis of the African American oral tradition, as evidenced through Langston Hughes and other members of the Harlem Renaissance.
Jean Toomer is a master at appearance and behavior, with this in mind, ergo, I acquiesce with Karla Holloway. She argues convincingly that Toomer's "Fern" leaves out the memory consciousness storytelling, the perpetual breaks and the constant wavering of thoughts that is apparent in Nella Larson's "Quicksand."

"Like the face, the whole countryside seemed to flow into her eyes. Fern's eyes said to them that she was easy."

"Cane" is written with Toomer's typical use of alliteration, syncopation and his metaphorical preacher's tone. However, he does attempt to give Fern some sort of voice. Although he failed at this endeavor he still demonstrates that unmistakable focus on her "eyes," appearance. The second above quote, "that she was easy" concentrates on behavior. Exceptional and typical are the words that come to mind when characterizing "Cane." Typical because Toomer can not rewrite what he is...

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This section contains 1,090 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Student Essay on Harlem Resaissance Response to the Oral Tradition
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