The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Essay | The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn: a Novel of Social Protest

This student essay consists of approximately 4 pages of analysis of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.
This section contains 1,062 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Student Essay on The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn: a Novel of Social Protest

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn: a Novel of Social Protest

Summary: Examines Mark Twain's use of satire in his novel The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn. Discusses Twain's objection to certain aspects of society that he disagreed with.
"Well, if I ever struck anything like it, I'm a nigger. It was enough to make a body ashamed of the human race," Huckleberry Finn remarked to himself and the reader after witnessing the king and the duke, two perfect representatives of the evils of society, conning an entire town and a family of poor orphan girls (Twain, 164). Using statements like this, Huck Finn made it blatantly clear that he often experienced disgust for the society he lived in. Having sprung the character of Huck Finn and all his opinions right out of his own mind, Mark Twain crafted the novel The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn as a weapon in his war of social protest.

From the beginning of the novel, Twain embedded his opinions of society into the protagonist and particular events or actions in the novel. The major...

(read more)

This section contains 1,062 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Student Essay on The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn: a Novel of Social Protest
Copyrights
BookRags Student Essays
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn: a Novel of Social Protest from BookRags Student Essays. (c)2014 BookRags, Inc. All rights reserved.