The Picture of Dorian Gray Essay | The Picture of Dorian Gray: The Impact of Vanity

This student essay consists of approximately 5 pages of analysis of The Picture of Dorian Gray.
This section contains 1,304 words
(approx. 5 pages at 300 words per page)
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The Picture of Dorian Gray: The Impact of Vanity

Summary: Explores themes from the novel, The Picture of Dorian Gray, by Oscar Wilde. Reveals how Wilde examines essential flaws of mankind through the symbolic use of Dorian's portrait, emphasizing his belief about the decadence of the soul due to narcissism and exorbitant pride.
Vanity and excessive pride eventually lead to self-destruction. In the novel The Picture of Dorian Gray, Oscar Wilde examines these essential flaws of mankind. The main character, Dorian Gray, renounces his soul in return for eternal youth and consequently suffers until his demise. Through the symbolic use of Dorian's portrait, Wilde emphasizes his belief about the decadence of the soul due to narcissism and exorbitant pride.

Wilde opens the novel in the studio of Basil Hallward, the artist who paints the infamous portrait of the "wonderfully handsome" Dorian Gray (16). It is in the studio that Dorian is introduced to Lord Henry Wotton. He immediately begins to influence the innocent young man despite his assertion that "all influence is immoral" (18). He urges Dorian to be selfish with his youth because "unselfish people are colourless" (76). Lord Henry convinces him that when his youth...

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This section contains 1,304 words
(approx. 5 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Student Essay on The Picture of Dorian Gray: The  Impact of Vanity
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