The Canterbury Tales Essay | The Use of Humor in The Canterbury Tales

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The Use of Humor in The Canterbury Tales

Summary: Analyzes Geoffrey Chaucer's use of satire and humor in his work, The Canterbury Tales. Focuses on the prologue of the work. Also examines the use of irony in the work.
It is often hard to point out obvious humor and satire in English literature. It may seem as though the narrator is diligently describing a certain character with positive aspects and whatnot. Such is the case in Geoffrey Chaucer's prologue to The Canterbury Tales. In the prologue he describes a vast amount of characters that are bound on a pilgrimage. One particular character he described was the Prioress, who is also referred to as the Nun. Chaucer uses satirical and caustic humor when he describes the Prioress. Because he doesn't use direct or obvious words when he is poking fun at her almost ridiculing her, it is misunderstood by some readers.

Chaucer uses different satiric devices when describing the Nun, that deface her personality. For example, in the line that reads: "Her forehead, certainly, was fair of spread, Almost a span across...

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This section contains 655 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Student Essay on The Use of Humor in The Canterbury Tales
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