Frankenstein Essay | The True Monster in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

This student essay consists of approximately 5 pages of analysis of The True Monster in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein.
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The True Monster in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

Summary: Examines Mary Shelley's novel, Frankenstein. Questions if the monster really is the sole person to blame for his murderous actions. Explores what responsibility Victor Frankenstein has for the deaths.
"God makes all things good; man meddles with them and they became evil" (Mellor).

Mary Shelley's book, Frankenstein, deals with the major dilemma of the creation of man. Rousseau deals with the topic of abandonment in Emile, which stemmed the thoughts of creation for Shelley in 1816 upon reading Rousseau's opinions. Rousseau blames the problems that children inhibit solely upon the parents shoulders (Mellor). Mary Shelley is able to relate to this statement on a personal level due to the parenting (or lack of) within her life. This in turn leads to a broader question concerning Shelley's Frankenstein; is the monster really the sole person to blame for his murderous actions? According to Rousseau's theory, the monster is not the sole problem. Victor Frankenstein is his creator or "father" figure thus giving him the responsibility of his monster.

"I felt as if I had...

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This section contains 1,429 words
(approx. 5 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Student Essay on The True Monster in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein
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